Archive for January 2016

Trinidad & Tobago – Not Just Calypso, Soca and Chutney

29
JAN

Written by

by Dorri Agostini

 

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Photo courtesy of The Supernormal Band – an upcoming Rock Band in T&T

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Caribbean Diaspora: How Can They Finance Development in the Region?

25
JAN

Written by

by Mark D. Wenner

 

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The Caribbean diaspora is huge and members tend to send significant amount of remittances back to the region to help relatives and to invest in property and family businesses.  It is estimated that Caribbean migrants number 4,116,000 in the United States (1.2% of the total population and remitted approximately US$5 billion in 2013. Other countries with large populations of Caribbean migrants are Canada (2.2% of total population), United Kingdom (1% of total population), and the Netherlands (3% of the total population). Migrants in these countries also remit substantial amounts, but the largest source market is still the US.

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Biomass Gasification: An Option to Reduce Energy Costs in Rice Milling

22
JAN

Written by

by Luis Miguel Aparicio and Mark Wenner

 

1Photo courtesy Mark Wenner. View of Rice husk intake into top of gasifier

 

Many agroprocessing activities require significant amounts of energy to produce the food and beverages we consume.   In the case of rice milling, energy is needed to dry unhulled rice to an ideal moisture level of 14%, to separate the husk from the grain, to polish the grain, and in some cases to parboil the grain, and then bag the rice.  According to the Guyana Rice Exporters and Millers Association, energy constitutes 20-22 percent of all costs, excluding the cost of purchasing paddy from individual rice producers.  The typical energy requirements in rice mills are heat generation and electricity: heat to dry the raw material and operate boilers and electricity to operate machines that peel, sort and pack.

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Reducing, Reusing, Recycling and Recovering Waste the Bajan Way

18
JAN

Written by

by Shamar Blenman

 

IMG_1393

 

The operations team of the Barbados Country Office of the Inter-American Development Bank decided to do something differently last month. Instead of its weekly operations meeting inside the comfortable air-conditioned Country Office conference room, the team ventured out on a mission to the Solid Waste Project Unit of the Ministry of Environment and Drainage, the Sustainable Barbados Recycling Centre (SBRC) and B’s Recycling Barbados (BRB). Our visit was facilitated by experts from the Solid Waste Project Unit as well as tour guides from the two enterprises.

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Rethinking the growth diagnostics framework

15
JAN

Written by

by Valerie Mercer-Blackman

 

In identifying binding constraints to growth of developing member countries, ADB and other multilateral development banks have adopted the Hausmann-Rodrick-Velasco methodology.

In principle the methodology is relatively straightforward: by looking at all the possible constraints to private investment—the main driver of economic growth in a given country–in comparison to its peers, one should come up with one or two critical constraints to growth. In practice, however, the methodology seldom yields ‘priorities’ because almost every issue can be shown, in some context or another, to be a major constraint to growth: poor physical infrastructure, lack of skills, difficulty in setting up a business, macroeconomic instability, high cost of finance, market failures, and governance problems.

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Proper Solid Waste Management Involves all of us

11
JAN

Written by

by Syreta Roberts

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Photo by Rosemary Clarice Hanna

The Bahamas markets itself as a Tourist destination: An archipelago of 700 islands and Cays with white sand beaches, aqua transparent water and a green and pristine environment. For the most part this is the case. However, garbage can easily be found on road sides, derelict vehicles in some yards, and in the nearby bushes of some areas in New Providence and the Bahamian Family Islands. Plastic containers, Styrofoam plates and cups left on beaches, are a common discovery. What is worst is that all of these items and more can be found in the sea.

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CTT Hosts First Procurement Live Event

8
JAN

Written by

by Shirley Gayle-Sinclair

 

On June 24, 2015, CTT hosted its first Procurement Town Hall Meeting with executing agencies (EA); however, it took a different name, Procurement “Live”.  The name was adapted from the Jamaican expression ‘Live and Direct’ which means face-to-face, personal and in real time.  The term Live and Direct was used by former Prime Minister of Jamaica, P.J. Patterson as a tagline for his around-the-country meetings with the public in parish capitals.

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DATA: THE KEY TO GENDERED TRANSPORT IN GUYANA

4
JAN

Written by

by Brian Mc Nish

 

IMG_2621Female passengers using public transportation in central Georgetown, Guyana. Photo author Nigel Durrant

 

Guyana’s 2015/2016 budget, titled “A fresh approach to the Good Life in a Green Economy”, established a veritable moral compass for the newly installed Government of Guyana outlining a new policy direction of people-centric development. The subsequent news release by the Social Protection Ministry in Guyana advising that the Ministry has recently commenced developing a national gender policy, provoked thoughts, at least for me, of how the IDB could lend support to these important initiatives by mainstreaming gender equity in Guyana’s transportation services.

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SURINAME: DIVERSITY AN INSPIRATION FOR CREATIVITY

1
JAN

Written by

by Nicola Karcher

 

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Sustainable Microenterprises in Rural Communities. Photo author Nicola Karcher

 

Suriname is one of the most diverse countries in the world; with an estimated population of 579,633[1] is represented by several different ethnicities including: Hindustani (37%), Creole (31%), Javanese (15%), Maroon (10%), Amerindian (2%), Chinese (2%), White (1%) and other (2%). This diversity is also reflected in the many languages, foods, religions and cultural activities and practices of the Surinamese people. In the quest for innovation, many pundits have emphasized that diversity can foster creativity and innovation in thinking and practice.   This was demonstrated earlier this year through the recognition of two Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF) projects from Suriname.

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The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Inter-American Development Bank, its Management, its Board of Executive Directors or its member Governments.

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