Archive for November 2015

Targeting, partnerships, and flexibility are building blocks to provide basic services in Haiti

30
NOV

Written by

by Winsome Leslie and Ralph Denize

 

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It is widely accepted that access to basic services is a key aspect of improving the lives of individuals at the base of the economic pyramid in any country. Unfortunately, basic services in Haiti are an outlier in two respects when compared with the rest of the Americas:

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Yes, Caribbean men are dying from violence, but what about women?

25
NOV

Written by

by Heather Sutton

256px-Purple_ribbon.svg

As we near the International day to End Violence Against Women, November 25th, it is important to recognize how little is actually known about the issue in the Caribbean. The impact of violence on different gender groups (men, women, boy and girls) is still understudied particularly in contexts – like those of many Caribbean countries – where high levels of urban violence have led to understandable focus on the number of homicides.  While they are less frequently victims of lethal violence, women do suffer disproportionately from intimate partner violence and sexual violence and may be repeatedly victimized, or severely traumatized.

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Civil Society Organizations in Jamaica: Building Capacity for Greater Impact

23
NOV

Written by

by Brodrick Watson and Dorothea Less

 

1Photo courtesy of Brodrick Watson –from left Mr. Keith Whyte-PMP Coach, Dr. William Lawrence – Mona School of Business and Management, Mrs. Therese Turner-Jones –IDB Country Representative, Professor Claremont Kirton- UWI Consulting and Ms. Flavia Milano -IDB Specialist, VPC

 

 

In this Age of Global Inter-connectivity where people are constantly connected together through social media and other means, a platform has been created for the role of civil society as a development partner to become more impactful and visible.

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Could everything we think we know about crime be wrong?

20
NOV

Written by

by Heather Sutton

 

The police are normally considered the first source of information on crimes committed. However, police crime statistics are only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to measuring and understanding crime. In the Caribbean, according to a forthcoming IDB publication, only 44% of common crimes were reported to the police in 2014. Globally it is estimated that less than half of common crimes are reported to the police (49%)(ICVS 1990-2005). For some crimes (i.e. assault and sexual crimes) the percentage is even lower – sometimes 10% or below.

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Meet Me in Bridgetown at the Intersection of Brand Equity & Competitiveness

16
NOV

Written by

by Lisa S. Howard

 

Bridgetown parliament buildings
Bridgetown Parliament Buildings. Photo author Nigel Durrant

 

Less than two months ago I was sitting in a French restaurant in an American city looking at an item on the menu called Meet Me in Havana. I frantically messaged a marketing communications friend and pointed out that it should have been called Meet Me in Bridgetown since the main ingredient has been made in Barbados since 1703! My friend calmly pointed out that Havana was branded better and the name Bridgetown was unlikely to conjure up any specific images.

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What do Startup Founders Need?

13
NOV

Written by

by E. Stefen Deleveaux

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Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, Author, Hagainativ

Entrepreneurs are fairly straightforward individuals. Most startup founders that I interact with (and I do my best to speak with as many as possible in my own time) are very clear about their challenges and needs in creating a business completely from scratch. These needs, while varying, almost always come down to two main elements: mentors and funding. > Read more

Local enterprise and Government keeping Barbados clean

9
NOV

Written by

by Adriana La Valley, Senior Operations Specialist

 

image004Photo author Adriana La Valley

 

The Caribbean is a region that excels as a tourism destination with its white sand beaches and clear turquoise water. But no one really reflects on what it takes to keep them clean and what it takes to dispose of waste generated, in a sanitary and sustainable way.  When it comes to waste, it is everyone’s business and it takes innovation and collaboration. Barbados has a Public-Private Partnership (“PPP”) that tackles the problem of managing tons of waste generated in a sustainable way.

I recently visited the Sustainable Barbados Recycling Centre, (SBRC) and it opened my mind to opportunities for PPP investment in the Caribbean Region no matter the scale.  SBRC started operations on June 2009, as a result of a long term contract between the Government of Barbados and a local private sector firm.  The goal was to receive and process the island’s solid waste to reduce or divert the amount that ends at the Mangrove Pond landfill.  Practices that reduce the amount of waste needing to be disposed of in the landfill are waste prevention, recycling, and composting.

This type of PPP arrangement could be replicated, by applying the lessons learned during its implementation. Key for project success is clarity of the revenue stream and to design projects in which public/private win-win situations are created.  Government receives a quality service and the private sector firm achieves a return on its investment.  This may be challenging when we speak of public services in which user fees may not be socially accepted and Governments need to pitch-in to sustain operability of project.  For this type of arrangement, all parties need to pitch in equally doing what each does best.

The method used to control disposal of the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) on land in Barbados is known as “sanitary land filling”.   Upon drop off and weighing of waste at the Facility, MSW is separated at the Transfer Station (TSP) and recyclable material is recovered.  Plastics, glass, or card board is baled for export to a paper mill for further processing. The whole process takes up to six months before shipping. Resulting from recycling processing, SBRC  produces byproducts such as mulch, soil, processed coconut and wood, tree logs and wood chips. These products can be used for landscaping or agriculture.

The remaining MSW is deposited in thin layers in a landfill, and spread by bulldozers in several layers then compacted to form a refuse cell. At the end the compacted refuse cell is covered by compacted soil to prevent odors and wind-blown debris.  This is key,  since the Caribbean paradise that is enjoyed at nearby neighborhoods, golf courses and hotels would lose their appeal, if enjoyment is ruined by an unpleasant hit to your sense of smell.

image010Photo author Adriana La Valley

The SBRC facility was designed to receive an average 500 truck-loads of waste, 365 days per year, which represents approximately 1,000 tons per day. However, it is only receiving around 400,000 tons per day and 60% diversion of the landfill.

One troubling fact I learned though, is that some products are more difficult to process since they have no recycle value. Can you picture artwork and furniture made with re-used refrigerators?  Refrigerators have layers of insulation on the metal, which is very expensive to remove and hence old refrigerators have no recycle value. This is an opportunity for innovation and finding a creative solution for a real problem. Let’s find them together!

 

image012Photo author Adriana La Valley

 

 

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3 IDEAS THAT SUPPORT OPEN SKIES IN THE CARIBBEAN

6
NOV

Written by

by Brian Martin Mc Nish, Transport Senior Specialist at the Inter-American Development Bank

 


3 IDEAS THAT SUPPORT OPEN SKIESParticipants of the IDB Think-Tank on the regional air transport agenda.

An Open skies debate erupted at a Bank sponsored think-tank which brought together aviation leaders from across the Caribbean to brainstorm on the air transport needs to enable deeper regional integration and to inform the Bank’s air transport agenda.

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3 Ways Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) Can Innovate Using The Skills Of Foresight

4
NOV

Written by

by Christel Saab

Foresight

I was 23 years old when I took a decision that would change my life forever – move to Houston, Texas-USA from Bordeaux, France to further my studies in a field called Studies of the Future. A bold decision but one I knew would give me the skills I needed to start my professional career. At that time, very few people knew of the field of Foresight, Future Studies or Alternative Futures as it is often called. And Clear Lake was the only campus of the University of Houston that offered such a degree in the entire United States! It was the perfect example of how innovation was brought to higher education and it lives on with Teach the Future, an initiative to bring futures thinking to students of secondary, post-secondary and professional education institutions.

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Long Beach: Our Place, Our Planet, Our Responsibility

2
NOV

Written by

by Lisa S. Howard

 

Long Beach: Our Place, Our Planet, Our Responsibility

CUB IDB AfterIDB Barbados Country Office Family & Friends Clean Up Barbados Team. Photo Author Lisa S. Howard

 

The once controversial refrain “Da Beach Is Mine” has become the unofficial Barbadian anthem about the ownership of our beaches — ownership accompanied by rights and responsibilities.

In September, The Greening Committee from the Inter-American Development Bank’s (IDB) Barbados Country Office made significant strides towards living up to our social responsibility when we took on the task of cleaning up Long Beach, in the Southern parish of Christ Church.

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The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Inter-American Development Bank, its Management, its Board of Executive Directors or its member Governments.

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