Archive for September 2015

Boot camps to kickstart public-private partnerships in the Caribbean

28
SEP

Written by

by David Bloomgarden and Dennis Blumenfeld

The concept of public-private partnerships is in vogue in the Caribbean. Some governments mistakenly believe that PPPs allow the private sector to build and maintain infrastructure like roads, and provide public services like wastewater treatment, with little cost to the public sector. This is not the case. However, in certain PPP projects, private-sector efficiencies can allow governments to deliver much-needed and improved infrastructure and services with greater value to society.

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Sir William Arthur Lewis’ 100th Anniversary

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Written by

by Diether Beuermann

2015 marks the 100th anniversary of Sir William Arthur Lewis’ birth. Who was Arthur Lewis?  He was a Saint Lucian born economist who in 1979 won the only Nobel Prize in Economics by a native Caribbean for his contributions in the field of economic development. In his most influential publication entitled “Economic Development with Unlimited Supplies of Labour”, Sir Arthur Lewis introduced the Dual Sector Model commonly known as the “Lewis Model”. In this model, when an economy first becomes industrialized it grows very fast by importing foreign technology and employing capital and plentiful, cheap, unskilled labor from the farm. But after a while the extra agricultural labor is put to work and wages start to rise. This makes firms less profitable and they have to come up with their own technology to keep growing. This shift is known as the Lewis Turning Point.

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The efforts Caribbean Countries do to fight Climate Change

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Written by

by Pablo Riba

11
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, Author, Hagainativ 

 

Climate change is affecting us all, there is no doubt about it. Due to human activities, like various industries and the massive increase of transportation, the number of greenhouse gases increased over the years. Now these gases, mainly carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, are unbalancing our environment by increasing the overall temperatures. Exceptions, like the periodic or temporary increase of temperatures, would not be a problem. The problem is that these changes tend to have a permanent nature, which affects the entire ecosystems, climate and also local human activities, like agriculture.

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Finding solutions for Jamaica’s Energy Sector Challenges (Part II)

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Written by

by Lumas Kendrick

The second part of the workshop focused on energy efficiency (EE).   Dr. Earl Green, IDB Consultant from Sustainable Energy & Engineering Ltd. presented preliminary results from the recently concluded IDB/DBJ  Energy Efficiency Pilot Projects study on energy efficiency for  Small and Medium Enterprises (SME’s) in Jamaica (JA-T1031).  Preliminary results show that EE measures applied to SME’s can be good investments with low payback times, depending on the efficiency of project execution. The chart below shows some simple pay-back times for the pilot projects. They systems with the longest payback times, e.g. worst economics (BT, Footprints and Sunrise) are the rooftop solar projects!  The IDB is developing a technical note on the project which will present the results in detail. The report is scheduled for publication in the 4th quarter 2015.

1  Source: IDB Report on EE for SME’s

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How can Jamaica lower the costs of energy? (Part I)

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Written by

by Lumas Kendrick

 

Energy Education:

Jamaica is confronting the daunting challenge of developing a national growth agenda to invigorate the economy and raise living standards for all Jamaicans. Economic growth however is inextricably linked to the cost of energy.  Unfortunately with no oil, natural gas, coal, or large hydro power resources, Jamaica has a narrow range of options at its disposal to bring down the cost of energy.  Thus the question arises, “How can Jamaica lower the costs of energy in general and the cost of electricity in particular?”

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Introducing Barbados’ Transit Solutions to the World

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Written by

By Khalil Bryan (Business Development Lead of Caribbean Transit Solutions Inc.) and Veronica Millington (Caribbean Transit Solutions Inc. Marketing Lead)

 

Screenshot_2015-06-16-11-46-46Photo courtesy of Pamela Proverbs

 

 For the first time, Barbadians have access to reliable public transport information, courtesy of our apps ‘BeepCap’ and ‘BeepBus’. Our company, Caribbean Transit Solutions Inc., uses GPS, mobile data and Internet technologies to provide our fellow Barbadians with the platform to search for local bus routes, and request and book taxis, directly from their phone.

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Some useful tools for the Caribbean when a natural disaster occurs

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Written by

by Hori Tsuneki

Volcano eruption Photo courtesy of Stocksnap

As the Caribbean region braced for this year’s hurricane season, the Inter-American Development Bank was putting the finishing touches on the Risk Monitor, a comprehensive tool to help regional policymakers consider relevant evaluation data in order to reduce the risks associated with disasters. The tool is not yet published online, but various IDB technical reports on disaster management are now available at: http://www.iadb.org/en/topics/natural-disasters/disaster-risk-indicators,2696.html

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Recycling for a better life

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Written by

by Jacqueline Dragone and Javier Grau

Belize 1Recyclers at Mile 3 Transfer Station, November 2014

A feeling of sadness ran through me as Carmelita told me about her life growing up in the “jungle”. The “jungle” as Belize City residents would know, was the old unsightly dumpsite at mile 3 on the George Price Highway that used to overwhelm the outskirts of Belize City with a horrible stench. Prior to the Solid Waste Management Project financed by IDB, the previous open dumpsite caused tremendous environmental problems for the people living near the site.

The people most affected by the conditions of the open dumpsite were the ones who were called “scavengers”; a group of marginalized people. Most of them lived in the immediate area of the site, and would sort through the garbage in deplorable working conditions to recover recyclable materials to be sold as a source of income to provide for their families. Frequent fires on the site often caused difficulties in accessing materials for their daily income; but more tragically it posed serious potential health risks to them as well. Carmelita recalled her days as a “scavenger” searching through an endless sea of trash for something ‘to hustle’, under the scorching sun.  > Read more

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The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Inter-American Development Bank, its Management, its Board of Executive Directors or its member Governments.

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