Archive for August 2015

Young Bahamian Entrepreneurs Compete to Develop Business Concepts on “Starter Island” Journey

28
AUG

Written by

by E. Stefen Deleveaux

Beacon-Won
Photo courtesy of Shift the Culture

Slowly but surely, the citizens of The Bahamas are realizing that they can no longer focus solely on large-scale tourism to lead them to prosperity and national development. As far too much of the Bahamian economy is dependent directly on foreign consumers and investors, many people are now doing their best to promote local entrepreneurship and innovation, to bring about more consistent and more sustainable economic development.

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Can we manage a natural disaster?

26
AUG

Written by

by Hori Tsuneki

rsz_126199main_katrinaa20052361550500m Photo courtesy of NASA

With hurricane season underway in Latin America and the Caribbean, it is time for a discussion about managing risks.   Our region is exposed to a variety of hazards, including floods, earthquakes, landslides, volcanic eruptions, droughts and hurricanes. In the last 35 years, the region has experienced more than 1,300 disasters that have claimed some 380,000 lives. That death toll is higher than the entire population of the Bahamas.

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The Rupununi Innovation Fund – helping small enterprises in Guyana’s Rupununi

24
AUG

Written by

by Hubert Forrester

Emily & HubertEmily sharing some of her produce. Photo Author Filippo Berardi

 

Meet Emily and her husband Muacir. They have a small farm, about one acre, in the south of Guyana’s Rupununi in Region 9—a beautiful, diverse, and remote area of the country that contains both savannah and rainforest. Emily and Muacir plant a variety of crops including bananas, peppers, pumpkins and the important staple: cassava. To get to their farm, they must travel over 8 miles via a very dusty and unforgiving trail. They usually use a bicycle; and sometimes a motorcycle when they are able to borrow one. Thinking about the air conditioned, off road SUV that transported me to their farm, I was pretty sure I couldn’t make 2 miles on the trail in that temperature, much less 8 miles!

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Jamaica Citizen Security and Justice Programme: Making A Difference

21
AUG

Written by

by Brithney Black, UWI Student

Participants graduate from the CSJP-JDF on-the-job    Training Prog

While there are several negative issues blasted in the media in Jamaica, I have come to know that all is not lost. Jamaica still has the blessings of a loving God – One who is working through the Ministry of National Security.

The Citizen Security and Justice Programme (CSJP) is a functioning violence-prevention initiative of the Ministry of National Security which seeks to build community safety and security through crime reduction programmes and social intervention. There are other social intervention programmes in Jamaica, but I am yet to come across a more dedicated group. The CSJP stands for and serves in the exact way they say they do. They practice what they preach. The CSJP serves 50 communities in Jamaica. These communities are selected based on their vulnerability and volatility and the CSJP seeks to make these communities better through their incredible ideas.

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Jamaica launches new electronic procurement system

19
AUG

Written by

by Leslie Harper

JA Procurement

Minister without Portfolio in the Ministry of Finance and Planning Horace Dalley (left) and IDB Country Representative Therese Turner-Jones. 

The government of Jamaica announced on July 31 the launch of the country’s first electronic procurement platform, which will improve the efficiency and quality of public procurement.

The system was funded jointly by the government of Jamaica and an Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) technical assistance program “Implementation of Electronic Government Procurement.” It will provide an electronic system for government procuring and tendering agencies and suppliers, and automating activities performed by these parties, by integrating them on a single portal.

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Have You Seen Sea Turtles Laying Eggs in Suriname?

17
AUG

Written by

by Mariko Russel

1Photo Author Mariko Russel

What tourist attraction comes to your mind when you hear about Suriname? If you are like me, in the beginning you would respond by “Suriname? Gee, I really cannot make any concrete images in my mind….”  Then you go to your laptop to do some Internet search, coming up with ideas like “visiting nature resorts surrounded by virgin forests” or “take a boat ride up the Suriname River to enjoy visits to interior villages.”  Alternatively you may think of “just enjoying the multi-ethnic, multi-cultural, multi-religious city of Paramaribo.”  Right? All of the above are fine options. However, as a resident specialist in Suriname, I am endowed with opportunities to explore different places to go and things to see in this beautiful, little known country.

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Barbados Hotels Benefit from Renewable and Efficient Energy Technology

14
AUG

Written by

by Pamala Proverbs

IMG_0647
Photo author Pamala Proverbs

 

Project Manager of the Sustainable Energy Investment Program in Barbados, Keisha Reid is happy.  One of her toughest assignments, getting hoteliers to sign on to the Energy Smart Fund, has finally borne fruit.  On Thursday, July 16, Reid took the media, officials from other government agencies and the IDB, including Country Representative, Joel Branski, and Caribbean Regional Department Manager, Gerard Johnson on a tour of the Barbados Beach Club, Christ Church to see the project in action.

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Caribbean Food Security in 2030: A Futurist Exercise

12
AUG

Written by

by Mark Wenner

1
Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons, Author,  Banco Carregosa

At present Caribbean states enjoys food security, with the exception of Haiti.   Caribbean states with available statistics report average dietary energy supplies greater than 100 percent, whereas Haiti reports 89 percent (FAO Food Security Indicators).  Nonetheless,  the majority of the Caribbean states are net food importers and only Belize, Dominican Republic, Guyana, and Suriname have either low food import dependencies or are overall net food exporters.    This means the majority have to earn sufficient foreign exchange through the exports to be able to finance their food import bill.   Since the early 2000s, real food prices have soared.  Between 2000 and 2011 the food import bill for the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) jumped from $2.08 billion to $4.25 billion (FAO 2013). Real food prices in medium are expected to stabilize at a higher plateau compared to the era of the 1980-90s but there will more be inter annual volatility.

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And speaking of prisons, a move to reform in the Caribbean

10
AUG

Written by

By: Lina Marmolejo, Robert Pantzer and Arnaldo Posadas

Obama-visita-prision-300x200
President Obama at El Reno prison facility, Oklahoma, Photo courtesy of the White House

It was a first in US history: President Obama on July 16 visited the federal prison facility in El Reno, Oklahoma, a gesture sure to fuel talk over reforming the American justice system, especially for non-violent offenders facing long mandatory minimum sentences. This is a welcome development. The incarceration rate in the land of the free has risen seven-fold since the 1970s and is now five times Britain’s, nine times Germany’s and 14 times Japan’s.

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Chronicles of a Fire Foretold

7
AUG

Written by

by Anaitée Mills

1
Photo courtesy of The Observer Jamaica

“….The day began like any other day. The family awoke early and the “likkle pickney dem” started getting ready for school. There was something different about that day though, birds were not singing, neither was the sun shining and the air was not filled with the usual Caribbean breeze. The day felt a bit too dark; “maybe it will rain”, said the mother to herlself while preparing breakfast. The air was filled with a smoky smell and it was heavy. “This is not rain”, said the father, “the dump is on fire!”

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The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Inter-American Development Bank, its Management, its Board of Executive Directors or its member Governments.

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