Archive for January 2014

How to get ahead in today’s world

30
JAN

Written by

by Adriana La Valley and Elizabeth Rodezno

A_Friend_in_Need_1903_C.M.Coolidge

photo courtesy of Wikimedia commons, A Friend in Need, by C.M. Coolidge

Trinidad and Tobago rank 92 out of 148 countries in the World Economic Forum’s 2013-1014 Global Competitiveness Report.  Most countries are stagnating in their competitiveness performance.  There is a need to investigate the ways in which we can break this stagnation. How to get ahead?  The IDB’s Country Representative Michele Cross Fenty, says the answer is effective use of business intelligence and analytics, coupled with improved strategic planning, decision making and business processes.  Today’s firms need appropriate decision support infrastructures in order to maintain and improve their competitive edge. > Read more

Regional Report: Tourism Finally Looking South

30
JAN

Written by

by CCB Caribbean Economics Team082000_0416

CCB’s Caribbean Economics Team is pleased to send the seventh Issue of the Caribbean Region Quarterly Bulletin.

It analyzes recent economic developments of The Bahamas, Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago. The Special Country Reports consider trends in tourism, and policy options for the sector.  For Guyana, the report examines one of this country’s main sources of external income: remittances from citizens living abroad. For Suriname, the report discusses options for establishing fiscal discipline and attracting private sector participation in the country’s development amid increasing expectations. The Bulletin also includes a section on recent developments in the countries of the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS).

Travel and tourism directly accounts for almost 30 percent of GDP in the CARICOM countries, by far the largest sector in most countries. However the global landscape for the sector has become more competitive and traditional source markets for the Caribbean are less dynamic.

The report discusses some ideas for the Caribbean to take on this challenge through diversification, namely, through the creation of new market niches, improved airlift, and the reorientation of supply toward emerging markets. It also analyzes the economic viability of an IDB project to bring new visitors from Brazil (the so-called “Brazil air bridge”). > Read more

Between Life and Destruction

28
JAN

Written by

by Guest blogger, @Marcello Basani 

IMG_4981

Water is life. Water is destruction. Whatever it may be, we can’t always control it.

On Christmas day, my family and I went to mass at the beautiful Basilica of the Immaculate Conception in Castries, St. Lucia, an architectural gem enriched by Caribbean and African influences.

Sadly, only a handful of people attended the celebration.

This was not because there was a drop in the number of faithful. This joyful event did not see the expected participation because on Christmas Eve, the island was hit by an unpredicted storm system that left behind death and destruction. Water and power supplies were disrupted. Hewanorra International Airport had to be closed for a few days. The infrastructural damage in some parts of the island was comparable to the one brought by the vicious Hurricane Tomas in 2010. > Read more

Known Unknowns or Unknown Unknowns?

23
JAN

Written by

The State of Statistics in the Caribbean

by Valerie Mercer-Blackman

In an increasingly globalized and information-thirsty world, getting the Caribbean name known will depend on good data. We all know of the great Caribbean stars: Usain Bolt is ‘the fastest man in the world’, and Bob Marley is ‘one of the greatest lyricists ever’. These opinions were built on facts: recorded sprinting speed of Usain, and number of records sold by Bob Marley.  But sadly, within the Caribbean things do not work that way.

When discussing their economy, policy-makers and knowledgeable citizens alike will tell you that ‘labor in the Caribbean is not productive’, or will shockingly comment on the ‘increasing gang-related crime rates’. They complain by saying ‘because we are small we are very vulnerable’, or will talk about the ‘government inefficiencies in executing projects’. They have no data or facts to back those assertions: unknown unknowns. They may be correct, we just don’t know. > Read more

Tessanne Chin’s Triumph and Its Impact on Caribbean Cultural Development

23
JAN

Written by

by Sudaney Blair

Tessanne Chin’s stellar performance in winning season 5 of the NBC television show “The Voice” illustrates some of the main tenets of the IDB’s cultural development policy in the Caribbean. Without a doubt, Miss Chin’s triumph will inspire many others from the Caribbean to engage their artistic abilities, and will encourage regional governments, the private sector, and civil society to invest more to promote the region’s cultural growth. > Read more

Kurt Kisto: Public Private Partnerships Can Add Sustainable Value to Caribbean Development

17
JAN

Written by

by Christopher Barton, EXR

Kurt Kisto, the IDB’s executive director for the Caribbean, delivered opening remarks at a recent Barbados conference on Caribbean Public/Private Partnerships (PPPs) for Sustainable Growth.

Kurt M.A. Kisto

Director Kisto’s remarks were later published as an op-ed in Trinidad’s Business Guardian. > Read more

What does Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce’s training share with development best practices?

15
JAN

Written by

by Julian Belgrave

Shelly-Ann_Fraser-Pryce_Moscow_2013_cropped (1)

Jamaican Olympic Champion runner, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has achieved the pinnacle of her sport through years of intense training and fine tuning her skills. What she has achieved has much in common with what development specialists seek to create with sustainable programmes.

> Read more

1 Billion people neglected and afflicted by disease. Is that possible?

13
JAN

Written by

by Guest blogger, @Marcello Basani 

“To neglect” means “to pay little or no attention to” something. Synonymy of “neglected” include: “disregarded, forgotten, ignored”

I can certainly say that I have “neglected” my social life lately, spending far too much time working. Also, according my colleagues, I have obviously “neglected” my appearance.

What puzzles me is that there is a typology of tropical infections in the world that affect about one in six people, which has been neglected, disregarded, forgotten to the point of being defined Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)! Has anybody heard about lymphatic filariasis and schistosomiasis, or onchocerciasis and the infections from the soil-transmitted helminthes? Anyone? And yet all these infections can be extremely severe, causing deformities, chronic disabilities like blindness, and social stigmatization. > Read more

Ten websites with up-to-date information on Caribbean development topics

9
JAN

Written by

by Sarah Berg

library of congress main reading room

Main Reading Room. View from above showing researcher desks. Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building, Washington, D.C. Photo by Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA.

All too often when searching for information on development issues in the Caribbean do we arrive at the list of results, only to discover that the latest uploaded paper, blog, news article, event notification, etc. was written in 2006 or earlier.  Or when researching a particular issue concerning the Caribbean, we get sucked into a long list of documents capturing all of the countries in the Americas. > Read more

The stink of ignorance (and the sweet scent of dignity)

6
JAN

Written by

by Guest blogger, @Marcello Basani 

As you have certainly come to appreciate from my previous posts, the brilliant results obtained through my post-grad education have given me a clear and indisputable intellectual edge, loaded with witty jokes and provoking statements. This privilege coupled with a particular European taste for the je ne sais quoi, might come across as snobbish attitude not required to enter the EU, but clearly preferred and expected. Oh, I so enjoy it. It smells smart. Cool.

> Read more

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Disclaimer

The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Inter-American Development Bank, its Management, its Board of Executive Directors or its member Governments.

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