Development that Works
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    This blog highlights effective ideas in the fight against poverty and exclusion, and analyzes the impact of development projects in Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • Tag: public-policy

    Found 6 posts.

    Positive Youth Development in Jamaica – A National Project

    By - 26 de September de 2017, 3:00 pm

    By Cynthia Hobbs, Darrell Hull, Lincoln Williams and Carolyn Thomas

    In Jamaica, more than 120,000 “unattached” 16-to-24 year-olds are not in school and are not working. Youth unemployment in Jamaica is more than twice (30.3 percent) that of adults (13.5 percent) and crime rates are highest among 18- to 24-year-old males.

    ja-l1005-3-7-cynthia-hobbs-darrell-hull-lincoln-williams-y-carolyn-thomas positive youth development

    Image: IDB.

    Many young people in this age bracket have given up on school because they don’t feel they are learning skills that will help them find a job. They want to work but do not have the needed job experience or training.

    Often they don’t have adequate skills in reading and math, or the exam scores necessary to get into higher education or vocational training programs.

    The government of Jamaica has designed two programs to help these “unattached” youth, both financed in part by an IDB sovereign guaranteed loan of $11 million: Read more…

    How much do impact evaluations (really) help policymaking?

    By - 30 de June de 2016, 11:53 am

    by Eva Vivalt.

    Increasingly rigorous studies have been done on the effects of development programs with the hope that these studies’ results will inform policy decisions. 

    However, the same program often has different effects in different contexts. There are many different variables that can affect what will happen.

    The key question is then: to what extent can we generalize from a research study’s conclusions? 

    impact evaluations

    Image: iStock

     

    If a policymaker were to decide to implement a program based on the results from impact evaluations, how different could they expect their own project’s results to be?

    Recently, I answered this question using data from over 600 studies in international development. The data focused on 20 different types of development programs, from conditional cash transfers to microfinance. Read more…

    The Juana Azurduy Voucher Program: health services for mothers and their children

    By - 31 de May de 2016, 8:00 am

    “I didn’t go to the health center because it took a long time, and on top of that they treated me badly,” recounted a Quechua woman in the town of Oruro, Bolivia. “We have our own customs for childbirth”.

    Source: IDB

    Image: IDB

    She is not alone in those views. According to a recent national survey, the main reason why women avoid prenatal care is distrust of health personnel (26 percent). Other reasons include the distance they must travel to reach the health facility (21 percent), lack of time because they are busy with children or work (12 percent), and opposition from their spouse or family (6 percent). Read more…

    Short-term triggers of agricultural productivity in Bolivia

    By - 29 de March de 2016, 7:00 am

    Thanks to the implementation of CRIAR’s program,  beneficiary households diversify their crop portfolio, producing nontraditional crops with greater value added in larger areas. At the same time beneficiary households are modifying their household economy, moving from self-sustainment toward a more market-oriented structure.

    Bolivian farmer CRIAR Bolivia

    Bolivian farmer. Image: iStock

    Carlos Pacheco is one of 17,000 beneficiaries of the CRIAR program in Bolivia. The program provides financial support to small-scale farmers to buy low-cost agricultural technologies, along with technical assistance to use and apply them. CRIAR organizes technology fairs in rural areas of Bolivia so that small-scale farmers like Mr. Pacheco can obtain information regarding various agricultural technologies and purchase those that best fit their needs. Read more…

    Cows and kilowatts: opportunities for development

    By - 20 de October de 2015, 7:00 am

    by Jesús Tejeda

    A program in Ecuador is a classic example of how electrification in isolated rural and urban areas can raise living standards and boost economic growth.

    16882976186_7558454d46_o pequena

    Each morning at 4 a.m. as the cocks begin to crow, women in the Prado communities of Ecuador’s Pichincha province put on their woolen pants, wrap-around shawls, and bowler hats, and head into the hilly pastures to milk their cows. Read more…

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