Development that Works
  • About

    This blog highlights effective ideas in the fight against poverty and exclusion, and analyzes the impact of development projects in Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • Tag: latin-america-and-the-caribbean

    Found 12 posts.

    To Guide or not to Guide? Using Technology to Improve Learning

    By - 10 de November de 2016, 1:27 pm

    By Elena Arias and Julián Cristia

    Considering everything that technology has made possible, from instant global communication to space travel, harnessing it to improve learning and revolutionize education would seem well within our reach.

    Using Technology to Improve Learning

    Image: IDB.

    Indeed, the IDB is looking at how technology can improve learning across Latin America and the Caribbean, where there is an urgent need to improve student performance in such a critical field as mathematics.

    In 2012, schoolchildren from eight countries of the Region participated in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), a test administered every three years to a half-million 15-year-old in 65 countries worldwide by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

    The Latin American and Caribbean countries were among the 14 lowest-ranked countries tested.

    This poses problems for a region that is seeking to raise productivity and reduce poverty and inequality, so the IDB has been trying to determine how technology can best be used to improve teaching and learning.

    To that end, the IDB undertook a meta-analysis: comprehensive and systematic review of 15 impact evaluations from around the world that focused on both guided and non-guided use of technology in the classroom.

    What can we learn from these experiences around the world? Read more…

    The 123 Mujer Hotline: Reducing Domestic Violence in Colombia 

    By - 1 de November de 2016, 7:00 am

    By Adria Natalia Armbrister

    Can an emergency hotline service reduce violence against women? Colombia finds that it does: women who use the service are 37 percent less likely to report having suffered physical domestic violence and are 16 percent less likely to report having suffered psychological domestic violence.

    123 mujer hotline

    Image: Gobierno de Medellín

    “On May 21, 2014 at around noon, I called the police because I was being abused by my husband. I had called the police before and they came and calmed down the situation, but things stayed the same after they left.

    The next time it happened, I called 123 Mujer and I finally felt that the situation would be resolved. The police detained my husband and I got psychological counseling by phone.

    They told me that I should press charges and I did. 123 Mujer also provided me transportation to the police station, then picked me up afterward and brought me home.”  Read more…

    How to measure the effectiveness of development projects?

    By - 11 de October de 2016, 7:00 am

    By Arturo J. Galindo y Tracy Betts

    For those of us working in the field of international development, it’s more and more critical to understand what works, what doesn’t work, and why to be able to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of what we do.

    Picture: IDB

    Picture: Inter-American Development Bank. Suriname.

    That’s the reason why it is of utmost importance for a multilateral organization such as the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) to systematically document progress on the projects it finances, as well as the lessons learned in implementation. Every year the IDB collects its progress and lessons learned in the Development Effectiveness Overview (DEO).

    The DEO is the gateway to the various IDB contributions to development in Latin American and Caribbean countries. Read more…

    Would you leave your children home alone while at work?

    By - 7 de October de 2016, 7:00 am

    By Claudia Piras

    Free daycare services do not ensure a significant increase in women’s participation in the labor market. Why? The results of an after-school activities program in Chile may have the answer.

    Picture: IDB

    Picture: IDB

    What is the most common reason given by women when asked why they are not looking for a job? Just what you might think: because they have to take care of their children.

    This was the answer given by almost 40 percent of non-working mothers of children under 14 surveyed as part of a study by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) study in Chile. The results can be viewed in the IDB’s Development Effectiveness Overview (DEO), an annual publication by the Bank that describes what works–and what doesn’t–in development.  Read more…

    How Do We Know if We Are Improving Lives? Multidimensional Poverty and Subjective Well-Being

    By - 27 de June de 2016, 3:54 pm

    The mission of the IDB is to work with the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean to improve the lives of their citizens. However, this process is not an exact science, so it is not always easy to ascertain whether that objective is being achieved. How can we know for certain that Bank-supported projects are helping people live more prosperously?

    Subjective Well-Being

    Image: iStock

    Responding to this question is not easy, above all because measuring improvements in people’s lives can involve different factors. How can such a measurement be undertaken? By carrying out a cost-benefit analysis or an impact evaluation with experimental methodologies for a specific project? By calculating reductions in poverty rates? By measuring levels of satisfaction and happiness of citizens before and after implementation of a public policy?

    Read more…

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